Um mapa da internet para torná-la mais resistente

Map of the internet could make it stronger
New Scientist

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Internet cartographers have tried for years to chart its extent in the physical world, in order to manage traffic and assess weaknesses. Such vulnerability was shown on 27 March, when three scuba divers were arrested for trying to cut an undersea cable off the coast of Egypt, where several critical cables come together in one of the internet's "choke points". And last year, superstorm Sandy's impact on internet connectivity in New York rippled all the way to Chile, Sweden and India.

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Barford and Roughan head up two separate projects that are attempting to change that. Instead of relying on sniffers, they are scouring ISP databases to find published information about local networks, and piecing these together into a global map. Roughan's Internet Topology Zoo is a growing collection of maps of individual networks. Barford's Internet Atlas expands on this, adding crucial buildings and links between networks to flesh out the map. So far the Internet Atlas, perhaps the most comprehensive map of the physical internet, maps 10,000 such structures and 13,000 connections. Barford presented the work at the University of Cambridge on 28 March.

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Negação de serviço sub-aquática

Mergulhadores apanhados a tentar cortar cabo submarino...

"What’s the least sophisticated, but probably the most foolproof, way to cut off a country’s Internet traffic? Literally cutting it by severing undersea Internet cables. That’s what the Egyptian navy caught three scuba divers doing in the waters 750 meters off the port city of Alexandria on Wednesday. The cable they were going after was the 18 000-kilometer-long South East Asia–Middle East–Western Europe 4 (SEA-ME-WE 4) line, the Internet backbone that carries data between Europe, Africa, the Indian subcontinent, and Malaysia and Singapore in southeast Asia.

Internet service in Egypt had already been off since 22 March, supposedly because a passing ship damaged a separate cable. The trio, who approached “hacking” from a different angle than usual, took to the water a day before repairs to the other cable were expected to be completed and service restored.

The effects of the ship taking out that cable were experienced as far away as Pakistan and India, Jim Cowie, chief technology officer at Renesys, a network security firm, told the Associated Press. Cowie noted that a severed cable can force wide scale data rerouting, with some of the packets traveling the long way around the world.

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Fonte: IEEE Sprectrum

TDoS - telephony denial of service

Emergency-service providers and other organizations are being targeted with TDoS (telephony denial of service) attacks, according to a security alert (PDF) from the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI, obtained by security expert Brian Krebs. TDoS attacks use high volumes of automated calls to tie up target phone systems, halting incoming and outgoing calls. Perpetrators are using the attacks to extort cash from target organizations, who receive a call from a representative from a purported payday loan company, who demands payment of $5,000 for an outstanding debt — usually speaking in an unspecified 'strong accent.'"

Fonte: Slashdot